Tag Archives: plant propagation

Planting the remaining 2018 garden veggies, replacing body mount bushings on farm truck, and seeding hundreds of annuals for urban homestead yard

Hey hey! Just thought I’d put out our post for this weekends projects. First was finishing the pre-summer work for the farm truck. As mentioned in last weeks post I replaced the radiator, belts, and hoses. So we’re good for the hot weather of summer to prevent breakdowns. Now this weekend first task of the day will be to replace the body mount bushings. These are what mounts the body of the truck to the frame, so you have a cushion effect to isolate road bumps from the passengers. These usually last quite a few years and the ones on this truck are original (10 years old). At this point in my vehicles ownership (based on age) I start pro-actively replacing suspension and drivetrain components just to prevent on-road breakdowns. Some of these components might still have a few years worth of life left, but having something like a radiator, hose, belt, or even a ball joint blow out leaving you stranded sucks. It can also eat up a weekend figuring out how to get a vehicle home or towed to a repair shop if you’re out of town…then you could be out hundred (and possibly thousands) of dollars. Continue reading

Homestead truck maintenance and putting in the first garden plants of the 2018 season

Whhhhhoooohhhhoooo Spring is here!!! This weekend was absolutely beautiful, Saturday was in the low 80s and Sunday I think got close to 90 here in the Pacific NW. For me it was bachelor’s weekend as Paula was down visiting her mother (and siblings) for Mother’s Day weekend. I spend Saturday working on the homestead truck installing a new radiator, thermostats, belts, and all the hoses. On a diesel this is no easy feat as there are multiple cooling systems sitting in front of the radiator. Over all this was a pretty fun day…when you get to be a mechanic on the weekends its fun…but I wouldn’t want to have that as my daily job again after being out of this line of work for over 20 years…:)

Sunday was spent planting, Yay! As I’m typing this blog entry I still have dirt under my finger nails…well still all up and down my arms, but come on!  I just don’t get this kind of one with nature experience writing software at work, so I like to stay like pigpen as long as possible on the weekend. I got 16 tomato plants in the ground around the yard in the garden boxes and planted 11 squash plants. We still have another 25+ tomatoes and 25+ squash to plant next weekend (OH THE TORTURE OF HAVING TO WAIT THAT LONG!). 🙂

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New overhead orchard-garden watering system, chop-n-drop some clover, and spreading the love with wildflowers

Hey Everyone, it’s been another busy weekend on the urban homestead. First things first, Paula and I had to pickup some supplies at the garden center (the organic garden soil in the photo is what we use for the indoor veggie grow operations):

Weekend project supplies for the urban homestead

Weekend project supplies for the urban homestead

With the supplies in hand and headed for home Paula and I formulated a plan…”Mr Mann you go out and do the dirty work and I’ll stay inside and make the Kefir and Kombucha…deal?”…”Yeas ma’am! That sounds good to me.” Continue reading

Tenting garden boxes, Taking tomatoes camping, and adding a new hanging herb wall

Hey hey! It was a crazy Pacific NW weather weekend here. Saturday was partly-sunny, but too wet still for doing the peach tree fungicide treatment (maybe it will be dryer Sunday…yeah right 🙂 ). So, we went onto task 2 which was getting the greenhouse plastic over the garden boxes to begin the warming of the soil and dropping the cover-crop to the ground so it begins feeding the soil microbes as they begin waking up. Here’s a picture of the first phase of operation “warm-up-chop-n-drop”

Greenhouse plastic over garden beds to warm soil and drop cover crops into soil for hungry microbes.

Greenhouse plastic over garden beds to warm soil and drop cover crops into soil for hungry microbes.

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